May 20, 2022

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Ex-Nissan CEO: I want an experiment to prove my innocence |  abroad

Ex-Nissan CEO: I want an experiment to prove my innocence | abroad

Carlos Ghosn, the fugitive ex-CEO of car makers Renault and Nissan, wants to appear in court to prove that the fraud charges against him are baseless and thus clear his name. This came in an interview with the BBC, after the French authorities announced on Friday Has issued an international arrest warrant for Ghosn

The former CEO of Renault and Nissan, who was one of the most powerful people in the auto industry, fled in 2019 amazingly from Japan. He was arrested there on suspicion of financial misconduct. Ghosn is accused, among other things, of misusing company funds for private use.

Ghosn holds Lebanese, French and Brazilian citizenship and currently resides in Lebanon. This country does not extradite citizens, but Ghosn cannot leave Lebanon either because of the so-called “red notice” issued by Interpol, which means that he is wanted internationally and could be arrested.

The former BBC chief executive said: “I want to respond in court because that is the only way to get rid of the ‘red notice’ that is preventing me from leaving the country.” Ghosn says he wants a trial in Lebanon over the charges brought against him by Japan and anyone else who might deviate from the French investigation. He told the BBC he was “confident” he would be able to prove his innocence.


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According to the Wall Street Journal, Ghosn was using the money for private purposes, including the purchase of a nearly 40-meter yacht.

Authorities in France are investigating indications that Ghosn may have transferred millions of euros from Renault through Oman’s Suhail Bahwan Automobiles. According to the American newspaper, “The Wall Street Journal”, Ghosn was going to use the money for private purposes, including the purchase of a yacht about 40 meters in length.

However, Ghosn strongly denies the allegations against him. “Not a single euro (from Nissan or Renault) has benefited me directly or indirectly.”

escape in coffin

After his arrest in Japan in 2018, Ghosn was forced to quit the automakers he drives. In December 2019, he managed to escape from Japan, where he was released on bail and under house arrest. He evaded security in his home, went undercover to the streets of Tokyo, and flew by private jet to Istanbul, allegedly hiding in a box for audio devices. He traveled from Turkey to Lebanon, which has no extradition agreement with Japan.

Since his escape, Ghosn has said several times that the Japanese charges against him are baseless. According to him, they aim to prevent him from merging Nissan and its French partner Renault. Ghosn previously said he fled Japan because he was convinced he would not get a fair trial in the country.


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According to Ghosn, an arrest warrant was issued against him because, according to French law, the investigation can only be completed on French soil.

“Surprised”

However, the investigation into his actions by the French judicial authorities has been going on for years. A French investigative judge recently questioned Ghosn at length in Beirut. The issued arrest warrant indicates that the French see an opportunity to try and convict Ghosn.

According to Ghosn, an arrest warrant was issued against him because, according to French law, the investigation can only be completed on French soil. “Somehow I was expecting something like this,” he says. “I was surprised by this moment and found out through an American newspaper (“The Wall Street Journal” was the first to write a report on Friday, editor)”.

In addition to Ghosn, the investigating judge in France has also issued international arrest warrants for four people linked to the car company in Oman.

Read also:

Former Nissan CEO Ghosn on escape from Japan: ’30 minutes in that box was the longest of my life’

The country’s most guarded millionaire escapes in the state of music

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