February 6, 2023

Taylor Daily Press

Complete News World

These eight women proudly step out without a wig. “I don’t want pity.” | Nina

Musical actress Anne van den Broeck, 46, who is battling breast cancer, shared her New Year’s wishes on Instagram. In addition, she posted a photo in which she can be seen for the first time without a hat, hat or wig. These eight women also choose to do the same: without shame, they show us their photos and tell us about their illness. “I don’t want to hide. We must honor that bald head.”

Margot Tilburgs (61 years old) from Essen: “I will wear a wig for others, not for myself”

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“After just one round of chemo, my hair was falling out in knots. “No…,” I thought, “…not yet?” Little did I know it was going to be such a standoff. I am battling colon cancer and the cure rate is thirty percent. But I am positive And I think it’s very important for everyone to dare to be themselves. I don’t want to wear a wig. It just doesn’t fit with who I am. I went to the store to get scarves immediately after my diagnosis. Six months later, they’re still in the same place: in the wardrobe mine “.

“A scarf or a wig leaves a mark and I would only wear it to others, not myself. The prognosis is bad enough, why would I do something against my will? I wear a beanie in cold weather, of course. What about the reactions? It’s all positive.”

Famke Lily Spruyt (40) from Laarne: “You’re not alone”

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“When I saw Anne’s picture, I felt that I wasn’t alone. It’s good. That’s why I also want to collaborate, to lay my heart out to my fellow sufferers. Above all to show life as it really is, without playing the victim. Hair loss is difficult. My hair was thick and very long But I’m not ashamed to show myself bald.”

“When I shared my story on my Facebook page, a lot of people said they thought it was bravery and that they were able to get something out of it. For example, a friend also got herself checked out for breast cancer. I like it. And if someone is hesitant to go out with a bald head : Do what makes you feel good. You are not alone. We go to connect.”

Ine Lefevere (34) from Kruisem: “The wig makes me sick”

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“People should know I’m sick. It helps, because then they understand you better. That’s also why I don’t wear a wig. I bought one, because my environment expected it. When I wore it, I felt sick. My face was rounder from the treatment and the wig felt like it accentuated it.” I ended up doing my hair myself. While everyone says it’s pretty now, it’s not what I chose. I miss my long hair terribly. And I still wear my hat a lot. It feels safe.”

“In the meantime I’m cancer-free, but I’m still fighting a fierce mental battle. I’m really struggling with the fact that I’ve lost my breasts and I’m not who I used to be. I also want to share this lesser side of the story, so people know cancer is more than Chemotherapy and you’re losing your hair.”

Wendy Feys (35) from Assebroek: “I don’t want a pathetic look”

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“In the meantime I have it again. This week I’m going to the hairdresser for the first time for a new haircut. (rays) Before that, I had no problem showing myself in public without a wig. Oddly enough, I have received countless compliments. However, being bald makes you look sick and I didn’t want to look pathetic because I felt the strength in you. Like a lioness who will soon recover for her lion and her cub.”

“During my bald head period I heard about a woman who wasn’t allowed to remove her husband’s wig because he couldn’t handle it. It made me so sad. Your self-image is so affected and then you don’t even have the support of your partner? I can’t get through to that. My partner always made me feel That I’m more beautiful. His support made me shine and honestly made me more beautiful. That’s why it’s so important to break this taboo.”

Brigitte van Gensten (63) from Tessenderlo: “It’s okay to watch a hairdresser shave me bald”

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“After the first round of chemo, I took the initiative to shave my hair all at once at the hairdresser. He asked if I wanted to curl up so I wouldn’t have to look in the mirror. I said, ‘No you, go ahead!’ For many women, this is a very difficult step. And I get that. But it didn’t do much for me. I found the loss of my eyelashes was getting worse.”

However, I think a lot of women benefit from this image. You often get ashamed of your bald head, but people actually find it very cool. My six-year-old grandson also had no problems with it. If I wear a wig, he asks me “Grandma, are you cured? I brought her back!” (Laugh) Meanwhile I have curls, more than before, and he compliments me on that too.”

Ferrell Straffen, 50, of Newerkirk: ‘I get nods of encouragement on the street’

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“I think the image of Anne van den Broeck is very clever. Hair loss is a very special thing to experience, especially if you have a thick head of curls like me. I was very sick before losing my hair, but the moment you lose it everyone sees that there is Something is wrong. It seems a lot of people are experiencing. I think some people get a strange feeling when they see a woman with a bald head.”

“Others give me an encouraging nod on the street when they see me without a wig, and it gives me so much energy. Every now and then a crazy kid looks in my bald head. Then you hear the parents say, ‘Don’t look like that.’ Then I told that kid I was getting injections that were causing my hair to fall out.” I’m just being honest, to break taboos. I’m still in my treatment, but I’m very resistant. I make plans and come up with my story and don’t give up. Others like it, I notice. Even people who aren’t sick.”

Dear Depoorter (43) from Wommelgem: “We made it a family moment”

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“She hasn’t had that much value to me since seeing me. If you’re healthy, hair is so important. You love making yourself pretty. If you get sick, you have other cats to squash. My 9-year-old daughter was so sad and cried. I wanted to enjoy something.” Ma, she was allowed to cut my hair. My husband shaved my hair with the razor after he “played with the hairdresser”. Our son took pictures afterward. So we made it a warm family moment. I’m still amazed at how bald his taboo is. When you’re in a cast, no one’s surprised. When You lose your hair, it suddenly becomes a thing.”

Valerie Marchand (41) from Ostkamp: “The first time without a hat, I cried with happiness”

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“I always have a strange feeling when I cover my head. It’s not right to hide myself away. I shouldn’t be ashamed, we should respect that bald head. I should be proud and proud that I have a chance to beat cancer. But society doesn’t seem ready for that. I hope The street scene would change, if more women showed their bald heads.”

“In June I went to see a kummel vu show. It was very hot there, so I took off my hat for the first time, on the upper platform. I felt liberated! I cried a lot there. I looked from that high platform at the singer who is also bald and thought: what’s the difference between my bald head ?Perception – perception.”

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