February 27, 2024

Taylor Daily Press

Complete News World

European airlines have not had to ground Boeings after the incident with the Boeing 737 MAX 9 in the US.

European airlines have not had to ground Boeings after the incident with the Boeing 737 MAX 9 in the US.

The FAA announcement was prompted by an incident Friday at Portland Airport in the northwestern United States, in which a small part of a plane disappeared after an abrupt takeoff. EASA accepted the FAA's invitation, but says airlines in member states in Europe do not have aircraft with the same specifications.

This does not mean that no 737 MAX 9 aircraft are flying in Europe. Corendon has two in its fleet, a spokesperson confirmed after reports by Dutch news program Hart van Nederland. However, according to him, those planes are built slightly differently. Manufacturer Boeing has also assured Coronton that the plane will not need to be grounded. Turkey-based Coronton Airlines, affiliated with the Dutch travel group of the same name, is also active in the Belgian market.

In the United Kingdom, the Civil Aviation Authority has written to non-British airlines asking them to obtain information about pre-flight inspections carried out in or on British airspace. Boeing 737 MAX 9 aircraft are not registered in the UK.

In China and India, Boeing 737 MAX 9 aircraft are not on their own airlines. India is asking its airlines to conduct a one-time inspection of the 737 MAX 8.

In the US, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has opened an investigation into the Alaska Airlines crash. The agency will also look closely at FAA oversight of Boeing and its manufacturing process.

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