August 10, 2022

Taylor Daily Press

Complete News World

The Danish natural gas field cannot be restarted until the end of 2023

The Danish natural gas field cannot be restarted until the end of 2023

Tyra, Denmark’s largest natural gas field, will not be able to produce gas again until the end of next year. TotalEnergies SE, the largest consortium shareholder that owns the tanks, reported this.

The main reasons for the delay are supply chain issues caused by the COVID pandemic. Tyraveld will naturally go live again in July of this year, but that has already been pushed back to June next year. It now appears that this target date will not be met either.

The field closed for business in September 2019 after the sea floor receded. The country itself was a net exporter of natural gas until that year, but has since become dependent on gas imports to meet its energy needs.

Russia was one of the countries I turned to to do this. However, this led to the shutdown of the gas tap in June, after Denmark refused to pay in rubles for the coveted raw materials.

German gas (or is it Russian?)

However, Denmark imported the lion’s share of its shares, about 75 percent, from Germany. However, the country’s southern neighbor is itself highly dependent on natural gas from Russia, which bought more than half of its supplies before the invasion of Ukraine.

Now that Putin has also threatened to shut off the gas tap to Germany, it appears at first glance that Denmark may have a problem. After all, the Russian dictator severely limited the amount of gas that could flow through the important Nord Stream pipeline in July. Flowing to Germany.

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Russia claims pipeline maintenance is the culprit, but European politicians say Putin is using gas as leverage to respond to sanctions imposed on his country after the invasion of Ukraine. In any case, there is a risk of an energy crisis in Europe due to the impending gas shortage.

other places

Despite all these things, the situation in Denmark is not as urgent as in other countries. After all, the country’s gas reserves are about 85 percent full, according to the Danish Energy Agency.

And soon you will also be able to import from Norway via the Baltic Pipeline. It is currently under construction and will transport gas from Norway to Poland from October via Denmark.

Other European countries are now also looking at alternative options to avoid the winter crisis. Italy imports more gas From Algeriabut Europe is looming too other African countries. The United States has also significantly increased its exports to Europe.

(fjc)