September 22, 2021

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DNA from a skeleton in Indonesia reveals a previously unexplored human species - SCIENCE

DNA from a skeleton in Indonesia reveals a previously unexplored human species – SCIENCE

Archaeologists in Indonesia have discovered a 7,200-year-old hunter-gatherer skeleton of a human species in Asia that has not been identified anywhere else.

The relatively well-preserved skeleton belonged to a young woman, between the ages of 17 and 18, named Bessi, who was buried in an embryonic position in Liang Banning Cave, South Sulawesi. It was found among artifacts identified as belonging to the “Toaleans,” a somewhat obscure group of hunters and gatherers from this region of the Quaternary period.

This is the first discovery of a skeleton from this group. DNA analysis shows that the woman is related to the ancestors of the Papists and Aboriginal peoples in Australia. But the genome is also linked to a human lineage that is not known anywhere else in the world.

The study was published Wednesday in the journal temper nature It is a collaboration between international and Indonesian researchers, after excavations began in 2015. “This is the first time that ancient human DNA has been discovered in an island region stretching from the Asian continent to Australia,” Australian archaeologist Adam Broome told AFP on Friday. “. This area, which scientists call Wallasia, stretches on the Indonesian islands east of Borneo to northern New Guinea.

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The researchers consider this discovery to be unique because ancient skeletons are rapidly disappearing in the humid tropical climate. Adam Broome noted that “remains of ancient human DNA are very rare to be found in the tropics, so it is an unusual find.”

This study challenges previous theories about human settlement in the region. “This shows how little we know about the history of early humans in the islands of Wallacea,” the archaeologist said.

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Earlier, drawings of tools and caves showed that people lived in the area 47,000 years ago. The first humans with Asian genes are said to have arrived from Taiwan about 3,500 years ago. But now it turns out that there was also another Asian human species.

Also Read: Large Population: Once We Share Our Planet With ‘Other’ People

The relatively well-preserved skeleton belonged to a young woman, between the ages of 17 and 18, named Bessi, who was buried in an embryonic position in Liang Banning Cave, South Sulawesi. It was found among artifacts identified as belonging to the “Toaleans,” a somewhat obscure group of hunters and gatherers from this region of the Quaternary period. This is the first discovery of a skeleton from this group. DNA analysis shows that the woman is related to the ancestors of the Papists and Aboriginal peoples in Australia. But the genome is also linked to a human lineage that is not known anywhere else in the world. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, is the product of a collaboration between international and Indonesian researchers, after excavations began in 2015. “This is the first time that DNA has been discovered,” Australian archaeologist Adam Broome told AFP on Friday. The ancient human population in the islands extending from the Asian continent to Australia. This area, which scientists call Wallasia, stretches on the Indonesian islands east of Borneo to northern New Guinea. The researchers consider this discovery to be unique because ancient skeletons are rapidly disappearing in the humid tropical climate. Adam Broome noted that “remains of ancient human DNA are very rare to be found in the tropics, so it is an unusual find.” This study challenges previous theories about human settlement in the region. “This shows how little we know about the history of early humans in the islands of Wallacea,” the archaeologist said. Previously, tools and cave drawings showed that people lived in the area 47,000 years ago. The first humans with Asian genes are said to have arrived from Taiwan about 3,500 years ago. But now it turns out that another Asian species is also present. Also Read: Large Population: Once We Share Our Planet With ‘Other’ People

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